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Open Access Highly Accessed Review

Evidence-based pain management: is the concept of integrative medicine applicable?

Rostyslav V Bubnov

Author Affiliations

The Centre of Ultrasound Diagnostics and Interventional Sonography, Clinical Hospital ‘Pheophania’ of State Affairs Department, Zabolotny str., 21, Kyiv, 03680, Ukraine

EPMA Journal 2012, 3:13  doi:10.1186/1878-5085-3-13

Published: 22 October 2012

Abstract

This article is dedicated to the concept of predictive, preventive, and personalized (integrative) medicine beneficial and applicable to advance pain management, overviews recent insights, and discusses novel minimally invasive tools, performed under ultrasound guidance, enhanced by model-guided approach in the field of musculoskeletal pain and neuromuscular diseases. The complexity of pain emergence and regression demands intellectual-, image-guided techniques personally specified to the patient. For personalized approach, the combination of the modalities of ultrasound, EMG, MRI, PET, and SPECT gives new opportunities to experimental and clinical studies. Neuromuscular imaging should be crucial for emergence of studies concerning advanced neuroimaging technologies to predict movement disorders, postural imbalance with integrated application of imaging, and functional modalities for rehabilitation and pain management. Scientific results should initiate evidence-based preventive movement programs in sport medicine rehabilitation. Traditional medicine and mathematical analytical approaches and education challenges are discussed in this review. The physiological management of exactly assessed pathological condition, particularly in movement disorders, requires participative medical approach to gain harmonized and sustainable effect.

Keywords:
Predictive; Preventive, and Personalized medicine; Participating medicine; Myofascial pain; Pain therapy; Acupuncture; Dry needling; Ultrasound; Neurophysiology study